Criminal Assignments in the New San Bernardino Justice Center

By popular request, here are the criminal law assignments at the new 247 W. Third Street San Bernardino Justice Center:
Courtrooms 1-4 will be unavailable until the fall (on the first floor)
S6 will be Judge Kenneth Barr (Misdemeanors)
S7 will be Judge Douglas N. Gericke (Preliminary Hearings)
S8 will be Judge Gilbert (specialty courts (drug court, veteran courts, etc) and video arraignments
S14 to S20 will be criminal trial courts, and I don’t have information on assignments yet.
Criminal will be located on floors 1-7.
Address: 300 E. State Street, Suite 517

     Redlands, CA 92373
Telephone: (909) 708-6055

The New San Bernardino Justice Center Assignments (as of April 2014)

Michael Reiter, Attorney at Law

I recently attended a meeting of GIEMLA and Judge Michael Sachs gave an update on the progress of opening the new Justice Center in downtown San Bernardino.  Here are some of the highlights:

15 Civil Courtrooms are available, of which 13 will be occupied.  Civil Departments will be located on floors 7-10.

20 Criminal Courtrooms are available, 18 will be occupied. Criminal Departments will be on floors 1-7.

There will be no pillars in the middle of the courtrooms.

Civil Assignments will be:

7th Floor:

S22 (Judge Donna Garza)

S23 (Judge Donald Alvarez)

S25 (Judge Keith Davis)

8th Floor

S27 (Judge Thomas Garza)

S28 (Judge Michael Sachs)

S29 (Judge Janet Frangie)

9th Floor

S30 (Judge Brian McCarville)

S31 (Judge John Pacheco)

S32 (Judge Pamela King)

S33 (Judge Joseph Brisco)

10th Floor

S34 (Mediations)

S35 (Judge Bryan Foster)

S36 (Judge Gilbert Ochoa)

S37 (Judge David Cohn)

Law and motion will be four days a week instead of 2

Limited Civil law and motion will be two days a week without a court reporter

Unlimited civil law and motion will be another two days a week

Judge Brisco will be the Supervising Judge for civil.

 

 

Address: 300 E. State Street, Suite 517

     Redlands, CA 92373
Telephone: (909) 708-6055

Update: Why Were The States in the Streets Named After States in Redlands Chosen?

By Michael Reiter, Attorney at Law.

As an update to this post: I saw retired A.K. Smiley Public Library Director Larry Burgess at Eureka Burger last night, and I decided to ask him how the state-named streets in Redlands got their name.

Mr. Burgess was kind enough to tell me that they were named by the developer, and at least one of them was after his home state. He subdivided the land into roughly 25 acre parcels for orange groves, the remnants of which still exist in the area.  He said the information was not easy to find; he had run across it in years past.

A search of newspapers gives these references to the streets:

Iowa Street: San Bernardino Daily Sun, August 14, 1912, Pg. 9 (crop mortgage)

Alabama Street and California Street: San Bernardino Courier, April 25, 1894, Page 8 (Notice of Sheriff’s Sale on Execution).

New Jersey Street: San Bernardino Daily Sun, December 11, 1906, Page 6 (Resolution of the Board of Supervisors of the County of San Bernardino responding to a petition of property owners requesting a protection district consisting of the Redlands Storm Water Channel (what appears to be known now as the Mill Creek Zanja).

Kansas Street: San Bernardino Daily Sun, July 9, 1914, Pg. 3 (Boy arrested for sandbagging).

Tennessee Street: San Bernardino Daily Sun, January 31, 1897, Pg. 3 (Petition for Mission School District to the Board of Supervisors)

Nevada Street: San Bernardino Daily Sun, May 2, 1903, Pg. 2 (Petition to have Nevada accepted as a public road to the Board of Supervisors)

New York Street: Daily Sun, January 31, 1897, Pg. 1 (House building permit).

Texas Street: Daily Courier, September 26, 1888, Pg. 3 (Redlands Cannery to be constructed)

He agreed that some were added later to keep up the theme.

 

 

Copyright 2014 Michael Reiter, Attorney at Law

The New San Bernardino Courthouse: Address And Name

By Michael Reiter, Attorney at Law

I received a notice today from the court on one of my San Bernardino District cases.  It says:

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: AFTER May 12, 2014, THIS CASE WILL BE HEARD AT THE SAN BERNARDINO JUSTICE CENTER, 247 WEST 3RD STREET, SAN BERNARDINO, CA 92415-0210. The above-entitled case has been reassigned for all purposes to the new court location as of May 12, 2014.

What does that mean to you, the attorney, the in pro per, the paralegal, litigant or secretary? On your captions, instead of Central District or San Bernardino District, start writing “San Bernardino Justice Center” and instead of 303 W. Third Street, write 247 West 3rd Street on Judicial Council forms or local forms.

Address:  300 E. State Street, Suite 517
                   Redlands, CA 92373
Telephone: (909) 708-6055

Leaving Your Keys In the Ignition In Your Car In San Bernardino: It’s Against the Law Part Two

By Michael Reiter, Attorney at Law

When I wrote the original Leaving Your Keys In the Ignition In Your Car In San Bernardino: It’s Against the Law article, I did not have the benefit of an article from the San Bernardino Sun.  Here’s the ordinance, which is still in force:

10.16.140 Removal of ignition key.
A. It is unlawful for any person having charge or control of a motor vehicle to allow
such vehicle to stand upon any street, alley or parking lot upon which there is
no attendant, when such motor vehicle is unattended, without first locking the
ignition of the vehicle and removing the ignition key from such vehicle.
B. Any person convicted under this section shall be punished by a fine of not less
nor more than two dollars; and such person shall not be granted probation by
the court, nor shall the court suspend the execution of the sentence imposed
upon such person.
(Ord. MC-460, 5-13-85; Ord.3880 §2 (part), 1980; Ord.2613,1964; Ord. 1652 Art. 4 §14, 1941.)

A story in the San Bernardino Daily Sun on April 20, 1955, Page 13, gives some background to the crime problem in San Bernardino about 15 years after it was already adopted.  The article had a photograph and was headlined “S.B. 20-30 Club Seeks To Reduce Car Thefts.”

Members of 20-30 Club No. 3 have taken on the project of helping to reduce car thefts in San Bernardino.

Hundreds of motorists Saturday will find yellow cardboard key replicas under their windshield wipers with a warning that “keys in the car” is a direct invitation to auto thieves.

“The project is one of the many efforts of the 20-30 Club to help in building a better community,” said Lloyd E. Harmon, second vice president and project chairman.

Club officers pointed to recent statistics indicating that 55 per cent of juvenile crimes in the theft of cars are aided and abetted by persons leaving their keys in cars.

A:  300 E. State Street, Suite 517

                   Redlands, CA 92373
T: (909) 708-6055

W: http://michaelreiterlaw.com

The Roots of San Bernardino Charter Section 186: A Political Perspective In Two Posts

By Michael Reiter, Attorney at Law

As San Bernardino looks to review and possibly reform its existing charter, last adopted in 2006, this is one in a series looking back at how the City of San Bernardino arrived at this point.

In the last item, the voters of the City of San Bernardino approved (by three votes)  a charter amendment in 1939 that guaranteed minimum raises to certain members of the police department.

A more in-depth look at the political background is found elsewhere, including the political roots of Charter Section 181-A, and the fiscal effect of San Bernardino Charter Section 181-A on the 1939-40 fiscal year budget of the City of San Bernardino.

The information you obtain at this blog is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. No attorney-client relationship is established by reading or commenting on this blog. You should consult an attorney for advice regarding your individual situation.

A:  300 E. State Street, Suite 517

                   Redlands, CA 92373
T: (909) 708-6055

The Roots of San Bernardino Charter Section 186: Chapter One

By Michael Reiter, Attorney at Law

This is the first in a series of articles to help people understand the historic context in which section 186, which currently sets the rate of pay of sworn police and fire employees within the City of San Bernardino.

Before the 1955 adoption of section 186, the people of San Bernardino amended the Charter to include minimum police salaries.

A special municipal election (consolidated with a primary municipal election) was held on March 20, 1939 to vote on Proposed Charter Amendment Number One.

Proposed Charter Amendment Number One read:

It is hereby proposed that Article Ten of the City Charter of the City of San Bernardino, entitled “Police and Fire Departments,” be amended by adding thereto a new section, entitled “Section 181A,” said section to read as follows:

“Section 181A:

(a) That the minimum rate to be paid to the following classifications in the Police Department shall be as follows:

Regular Patrolmen, Relief Patrolmen, Traffic Patrolmen, Special Officers and Plain Clothes Officers–A minimum salary of $135.00 per month, said salary to be increased in the sum of $5.00 per month at the end of each six months’ continuous service until a salary of $175.00 is reached, which salary of $175.00 shall thereafter be the minimum salary to be paid said officer.

Desk Sergeants–A minimum salary of $190.00 per month.

Patrol Sergeants–A minimum salary of $190.00 per month.

Motorcycle Officers–A minimum salary of $155.00 per month, based on one year’s service as a Police Officer, said salary to be increased in the sum of $5.00 per month at the end of each six months’ continuous service, until a salary of $185.00 is reached, which salary shall thereafter be the minimum salary to be paid said officer.

Traffic Sergeants–A minimum salary of $200.00 per month.

(b) That the officer’s length of continuous service elapsing prior to the adoption of this provision shall be included in determining said minimum salaries.

(c) That said section shall not be construed to set out or limit the classifications of members of the Police Department, but is intended solely to establish a minimum rate of pay for those classifications herein referred to.”  Statutes of California, 1939, Chapter 38, Pages 3162-3163.

The results of the election were decided by absentee votes.  The Council canvassed the vote on March 27, 1939 and found: 5,264 votes in favor, 5,261 votes against.  The absentee votes ran 75 percent in favor and 25 percent against.

 

The information you obtain at this blog is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. No attorney-client relationship is established by reading or commenting on this blog. You should consult an attorney for advice regarding your individual situation.

A:300 E. State St., Suite 517
Redlands, CA 92373-5235
T: (909) 708-6055
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