City of San Bernardino returning California Mobilehome Parks Act responsibility back to the State of California

By Michael Reiter, Attorney at Law

Yesterday, at the October 1, 2012 meeting of the Mayor and Common Council, the council voted 6-0 (with Council member Wendy McCammack absent) to lay over for final adoption an ordinance repealing San Bernardino Municipal Code Chapter 15.55 and returning responsibility for enforcing the California Mobilehome Parks Act to the State of California through the Department of Housing and Community Development.  A substitute motion proposed by staff to transfer responsibility to the code enforcement division was withdrawn.

When I was a Deputy City Attorney for the City of San Bernardino, I had to review every mobilehome notice of violation before they were issued. Long-time readers of this blog will remember that I was hired about a month after the City’s closure of the Cypress Inn Mobilehome Park and the Valente Duran letter.

Because of cut backs related to the City’s bankruptcy, the staff responsible for the inspections was cut.   The move to return responsibility to the state will save about $100,000 according to the staff report, a rather small amount of the City’s budget.

During the roughly sixteen minute discussion, City Attorney James F. Penman said that the need for local inspections was great, that the condition of the City’s mobilehome parks had deteriorated in the last ten to fifteen years, that he didn’t know the solution, because he was confident that code enforcement did not have sufficient training to do the job.

The information you obtain at this blog is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. No attorney-client relationship is established by reading or commenting on this blog. You should consult an attorney for advice regarding your individual situation.

A: 300 E. State St., Suite 517
Redlands, CA 92373-5235
T: (909) 296-6708

City of San Bernardino Mayor’s Office Chart as of July 23, 2012

By Michael Reiter, Attorney at Law

As a follow-up to the post on San Bernardino’s Fiscal Emergency Operation Plan Memorandum, the snapshot of the City of San Bernardino’s Community Development Department Code Enforcement Division, and  Enforcement salaries, and  organization of the City Manager’s Office in San Bernardino, dated July 23, 2012, this is a look at the organization of the Mayor’s Office, headed by San Bernardino Mayor Patrick J. Morris.

As you might guess, Mayor Patrick Morris is at the top of the organizational chart. The first branch under the top of the tree is a branch with the Executive Assistant to the Mayor, Julie Frazier-Matthews.  To the right of that is a leaf that says “Education Partnerships.”  In this chart, an Office Assistant, Raymond Lomeli, reports to the Executive Assistant to the Mayor.  To the right of the Office Assistant is another leaf that says “Administration & Customer Service.”

Below the branch with the Executive Assistant to the Mayor is another branch, on the left side of the organizational tree.  It has one leaf, Chief of Staff Jim Morris.  Jim Morris is the son of Mayor Patrick Morris.

Then, directly below the Executive Assistant to the Mayor and the Chief of Staff, but reporting directly to the Mayor (according to the organizational chart) are three branches, “Environmental & Healthy City Partnerships,” Transportation Partnerships & Intergovernmental Relations,” and “Community Safety Partnerships.”  Each has one employee.  Under the first, “Environmental & Healthy City Partnerships,” is Assistant to the Mayor I, Avianna Cerezo.  Next, under “Transportation Partnerships & Intergovernmental Relations” is Assistant to the Mayor III, Casey Dailey.  Lastly, under “Community Safety Partnerships” is Kent Paxton.

In all, we see as of July 23, 2012, there are seven positions in the Mayor’s Office.  However, according to the proposed budget attached before the organizational chart, there is no line item showing amounts budgeted for salary or benefits for Chief of Staff.  The requested budget for FY 2012-2013 shows $730,434 (an 18.8 percent increase over projected FY 2011-2012)  for salary and benefits for the Mayor’s Office, and $931,715 for the requested budget for FY 2012-2013 (a 1.9 percent decrease from projected FY 2011-2012.  The decrease in the proposed non-personnel budget comes from just two line items: a decrease of $13,700 (to zero) in Professional/Contractual Services and $700 (from $800 to $100) in Fleet Charges, fuel.

The information you obtain at this blog is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. No attorney-client relationship is established by reading or commenting on this blog. You should consult an attorney for advice regarding your individual situation.

A: 300 E. State St., Suite 517
Redlands, CA 92373-5235
T: (909) 296-6708

City of San Bernardino City Manager’s Office Organizational Chart July 23, 2012

By Michael Reiter, Attorney at Law

As a follow-up to Tuesday’s post on San Bernardino’s Fiscal Emergency Operation Plan Memorandum, Wednesday’s snapshot of the City of San Bernardino’s Community Development Department Code Enforcement Division, and Code Enforcement salaries yesterday, here is more from the City of San Bernardino’s Fiscal Emergency Operation Plan Memorandum showing the organization of the City Manager’s Office in San Bernardino, dated July 23, 2012.

This was found on page  36 of the Fiscal Emergency Operation Plan Memorandum.

The chart shows Interim City Manager Andrea Travis-Miller at the top, with a vacant Assistant City Manager position, and Executive Assistant to City Manager Tanya Romo below Interim City Manager Andrea Travis-Miller, and co-equal on the chart to the vacant Assistant City Manager position.  Below those two positions are two divisions, Community Relations – Public Information, and Administrative Support.  In the Community Relations – Public Information column are nine positions, two of which are vacant.  At the top is the “Manager of Communications,” listed as vacant.  Next is Neighborhood Services Coordinator/Assistant of the City Manager, also listed as vacant.  There is a “Community Relations Supervisor/Assistant of the City Manager, who is above five SB Direct Call Taker (including a Senior SB Direct Call Taker.

On the Administrative Support division, there is one Assistant To The City Manager, a CDBG (Community Development Block Grant) Project Manager/Assistant of the City Manager, a Management Analyst II/Assistant of the City Manager, and an Administrative Assistant to [the] City Manager.

We see four kinds of nomenclature for assistants in the City Manager’s Office.  There is the vacant Assistant City Manager, there is the Executive Assistant to the City Manager, and an Assistant to the City Manager, and there are two Assistants of the City Manager (one is vacant).

When I was last employed by the City of San Bernardino, only one of the twelve people in the City Manager’s Office was there.

There will probably be some cuts to the City Manager’s Office in the reorganization process / bankruptcy, but I do not imagine it will be as severe as the cuts to other departments.

The information you obtain at this blog is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. No attorney-client relationship is established by reading or commenting on this blog. You should consult an attorney for advice regarding your individual situation.

A: 300 E. State St., Suite 517
Redlands, CA 92373-5235
T: (909) 296-6708

City of San Bernardino Code Enforcement Salaries and Benefits as of July 24, 2012

By Michael Reiter, Attorney at Law

As a follow-up to Tuesday’s post on San Bernardino’s Fiscal Emergency Operation Plan Memorandum, and yesterday’s snapshot of the City of San Bernardino’s Community Development Department Code Enforcement Division contained in the memorandum, here are more details from the Operation Plan Memorandum regarding Code Enforcement Salaries.

This was found on page 48 of the Fiscal Emergency Operation Plan Memorandum.

As you can see, it shows the Code Enforcement Division Manager budged at $132,565 in salary and benefits, including salary, the employee portion of PERS, the employer portion of PERS, unemployment, fringe benefits, and the employer portion of Medicare.  The City of San Bernardino does not pay into Social Security.  You can also see that a portion of the Community Development Director’s salary is shown in Code Enforcement, $53,347 in total.  The three supervising code compliance officers each are budgeted $113,545.  Of course, that doesn’t mean they are taking home $113,545, but that is the current budgeted cost of the position.  The two Senior Code Compliance Officer positions are set at $102,915 in salary and benefits.  The lowest-cost employees appear to be the Code Compliance Processing Assistants without special pay.  They are budgeted at $53,007 each.

In total, $3,024,254 are allocated towards Code Enforcement salaries in the City of San Bernardino.  As the Mayor and Common Council make cuts in anticipation for Chapter 9 Bankruptcy, this amount going forward could be cut through agreed-upon give-backs or lay-offs.

The thing that seems strange about the numbers is that all similarly situated code enforcement officers and other positions are receiving the exact same amount of pay, which if they were all stepped-out would make sense, and like I said before, a lot of the officers were there when I started as a Deputy City Attorney in 2001.  Also, it shows salaries for more officers than positions that are currently filled.

The information you obtain at this blog is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. No attorney-client relationship is established by reading or commenting on this blog. You should consult an attorney for advice regarding your individual situation.

Milligan, Beswick, Levine & Knox, LLP
A: 1447 Ford St. #201
      Redlands, CA 92374
T: (909) 296-6708

 

City of San Bernardino Code Enforcement Organizational Chart as of July 17, 2012

By Michael Reiter, Attorney at Law

As a follow-up to yesterday’s post on San Bernardino’s Fiscal Emergency Operation Plan Memorandum, here is a snapshot of the City of San Bernardino’s Community Development Department Code Enforcement Division contained in the memorandum.

On Page 50 of the Memorandum is an organizational chart for Code Enforcement dated July 17, 2012.  It details the names and titles of the code enforcement officials responsible for code enforcement in the City of San Bernardino as of July 17, 2012.  In all, it shows 34 filled positions, and two vacant positions.  There is a Code Enforcement Manager, Steve Wilkomm, and three Supervisor Code Enforcement Officers.  The three Supervisor Code Enforcement Officers were all with the City when I was last a Deputy City Attorney, and two of them were with Code Enforcement before I became a Deputy City Attorney in 2001.  In all, there are still 19 code enforcement employees that were employed at the time I left the City of San Bernardino to become the Assistant City Attorney of Redlands.

While this organization chart is likely to change in the coming months because of the Chapter 9 bankruptcy and the planned (but heretofore proposed) reorganization, likely retirements and possible further attrition, this chart gives the public insight into how Code Enforcement in San Bernardino is organized at the moment.

The information you obtain at this blog is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. No attorney-client relationship is established by reading or commenting on this blog. You should consult an attorney for advice regarding your individual situation.

Milligan, Beswick, Levine & Knox, LLP
A: 1447 Ford St. #201
      Redlands, CA 92374
T: (909) 296-6708