Using a Bluetooth Keyboard WIth an iPad 2: First Impressions

By Michael Reiter, Attorney at Law.

I have written before about the iPad 2 about whether it was a serious legal tool.  I concluded  that it was not particularly because you couldn’t touch type on the screen.  I had meant to buy a case keyboard combination for the iPad 2, but I neglected to do so.  Until today.

I bought the Logitech / ZAGGmate case keyboard combination at Costco.  It was on sale with an instant rebate for about $50.

First, the good.  There are a few special iPad tools, such as cut and paste, but like special keys on a regular keyboard, you usually have to look down to find them.  The best feature are cursor keys.

You can touch type on it, but it’s only about as good as a keyboard on a netbook.  Good, but not as good on a full size  keyboard.  But it is light years away from the keyboard version.  However since it is a case combination,  my palms tend to rest on the somewhat hard aluminum of the case

I am used to a trackpad and find myself reaching for one.  However, since the touchscreen capabilities of the iPad still work, I think that I can find a work around for it.

The keyboard is good enough for a quick blog post (which was so difficult with the  keyboard), for a medium size email.   There appears to be some redundancy that makes typing really quickly problematic.  Wordpress seems to have some problem with cutting and pasting, but that’s probably a WordPress problem.

I can see it would be good to take notes at a deposition, but I don’t have an app right now that does that.  I’m not sure I would write a summary judgment motion on it, even if you could rig it up.

In short, probably worth $50, don’t expect miracles, makes it easier to write email and short blog posts.

The information you obtain at this blog is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. No attorney-client relationship is established by reading or commenting on this blog. You should consult an attorney for advice regarding your individual situation.

A: 300 E. State St. Suite 517
Redlands CA 92373-5235
T: (909) 296-6708

Is the Apple iPad a Serious Legal Tool?

By Michael Reiter, Attorney at Law.

I have had my iPad 2 for about six months now. I do not use it much for work. It has its plusses. The Westlaw Next app works as well as the web version. Email is much easier than on the iPhone. This post is being mostly created on the iPad, but I am going to add the HTML on a real computer.

However, it is next to impossible to type anything but a short note. The keyboard does not give the right feedback, and even a netbook gives you a better typing experience. I have considered a Bluetooth Keyboard, but isn’t the Leading feature of the iPad its size? I also don’t understand the people buying a massive iPad protector. For one, it is pretty durable. But once again, you lose some of its agility

The iPad 2 does some things great (video, amazing battery life, the calendar [September 19, 2011 update from a computer: instant on]) other things well ( reading, the web), and some things not well (syncing, backup, printing, multitasking, copying, and multi-touch sometimes is not a precise as I would like), but I have not even bothered to try to do the one thing that I need the most: word processing. Yes, I know there are a few apps out there.

When I started my own practice, I finally abandoned WordPerfect. I had tried before, but pleadings were more difficult, and I always had support staff or colleagues who were resistant. I started off using WordStar before I even learned to type. When I switched from MS-DOS to Windows 3.1, I had to switch out to do word processing. If only there was a better way. Through the miracle of academic pricing, I discovered the best piece of software ever designed, and never bettered: Microsoft Word 2.0. It did everything.

But I digress. What I need is Word (and Excel) for iPad. I don’t want an emulator, because I cannot have any glitches that take an hour to get out of a pleading. Until that moment arrives, the iPad cannot “party seriously.”

The information you obtain at this blog is not, nor is it intended to be, legal advice. No attorney-client relationship is established by reading or commenting on this blog. You should consult an attorney for advice regarding your individual situation.

Address : 300 E. State St. #517
Redlands, CA 92373
Telephone: (909) 296-6708